Rebellion by design: when ceramics and textiles get radical – FT.com

 

 

Duncan Grant's studio at Charleston house Sussex UK

Duncan Grant’s studio at Charleston house Sussex UK

Rebellion by design: when ceramics and textiles get radical – FT.com

Design has shown a rebellious streak in recent months. At the opening of the Subversive Design exhibition at Brighton Museum and Art Gallery on England’s south coast late last year, curator Stella Beddoe defended the ability of applied and decorative arts to challenge convention and tackle serious social issues.   …

Oliver Winchester, chief curator of the Design Museum in London, cites Italian furniture design of the 1960s and 1970s as a hotbed of political thought. “Italy was always thinking about the object itself in antithesis to the American focus on mass production,” he says. In the museum’s permanent collection is the “AEO chair”, designed in 1973 by Paolo Deganello, co-founder of the Archizoom group in Florence. Deganello was not interested in beauty, but in comfort, hailing a new era of functional aesthetic in furniture design. “Each constituent part was designed to be as comfortable as possible,” says Winchester. “The focus is on putting the parts together, transferring the power of construction to the user.” By using a network of small-scale suppliers who would produce the individual parts of the chair, Deganello connected craftsmanship to mass production.

What Deganello shared with his contemporary designers was a desire to see the consumer actively participate in his politics. Italian designer Enzo Mari was also a proponent of the blueprint, producing self-assembly kits for chairs and beds throughout the 1970s. He was opposed to mass production and believed home furniture could be a statement of an individual’s social beliefs. “[Mari] was interested in the art of constructing furniture as a way of educating people and encouraging them to appreciate the art of manufacturing design,” says Winchester.

Michael Marriott, a London-based furniture designer, dislikes the current hunger for “eye-catching work that often ignores ecological concerns. Design is now driven by image and a desire for the new as opposed to [the] better”. For Marriott, good design needs to withstand time and passing fashions; that something is robust is the most important facet of an object.

An excellent article by Harriet Baker – that highlights a shift in current design and craft.


Times Higher Education

 

Is this a more workable model ?

 

Times Higher Education.

David Latchman, master of the college, said shorter part-time degree programmes, which usually last at least four years, had been vital to his institution’s success.

For the first time in its 191-year history, Birkbeck this year admitted more part-time undergraduates studying over three years than students studying over four years.

Next year, Professor Latchman expects about 1,100 students to enrol on three-year courses, up from about 850 this year. All courses taught over four years will also be available over three years in 2014-15 – up from just three subjects offered in the shorter format when it was launched in 2010-11.

The three-year programmes are attracting different types of students from the mature learners who typically apply to Birkbeck, Professor Latchman toldTimes Higher Education. “We’re starting to appeal to 18- to 20-year-olds who ask ‘why should I go to university full time and spend my Saturdays stacking shelves in Tesco when I could study in the evening and apply my learning to my employment?’,” he said.

“We are also getting a lot of 21- and 22-year-olds who may have gone straight into work from school, but are now seeing graduates entering the workplace and being promoted ahead of them,” he added.

Part-time degrees over three years are also attractive because those doing the courses are eligible for maintenance loans, worth up to £7,751 a year in London next year, unlike traditional part-time students, Professor Latchman said.

The courses, held in the evenings, are also advertised by Ucas, unlike other part-time courses, which opens Birkbeck up to a wider audience, although such students will count towards its places quota until caps are scrapped in 2015-16.

 


Memories of the future | The Charnel-House

 

Memories of the future | The Charnel-House.

An immensely  interesting article on Ross Wolfe’s blog, that will reward several re-reads. He offers a thorough critique of the writing of ‘Bifo’ (Franco Berardi) After the Future. 


studio swine transport mobile foundry to create can city

 

studio swine transport mobile foundry to create can city.

ransporting a mobile foundry around the streets of são paulo, brazil, designers at ‘studio swine’ have created ‘can city’, a series of stools made from recycled materials. the foundry smelts aluminum cans using waste vegetable oil that they collect from local cafes to be used as fuel. operating around the city streets, the moulds and the finished pieces are all made on location, turning these public spaces into an improvised manufacturing line. in a city with some 20 million inhabitants, the waste is on a massive scale, over 80% of the recycling is collected by an informal system of independent collectors known as catadores who pull their handmade carts around the streets. this new initiative creates a system where their livelihoods can extend beyond the rubbish collection. 

Is this adhoc making the future of manufacturing ? … or a parasitical activity that feeds on a waning mass manufacturing society. What does the future look like?  How does it involve repurposing the past ?


Alternative art schools: a threat to universities? | Education | The Guardian

 

Good to see educational alternatives springing up to challenge the status quo …

Alternative art schools: a threat to universities? | Education | The Guardian.


What’s important about craft? – Norwegiancrafts.no

 

Glen Ademson writing about his thoughts whilst curating this Nowegian show

What’s important about craft? – Norwegiancrafts.no.


To encourage creativity, Mr Gove, you must first understand what it is | Ken Robinson

 

An excellent articl by Ken Robinson … Again

To encourage creativity, Mr Gove, you must first understand what it is | Ken Robinson.


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